nutrition


Conversations to connect the farm gate & consumer plate

The advent of social media has brought the diversity of food opinions to clear light. I listen and participate in hundreds of conversations daily with people around the world. It’s beneficial to converse about food, its’ origins, the people who produce it and how the agrifood system works. It’s also immensely frustrating to see how polarizing food and farming have become. (more…)

The University of Wisconsin – Madison employed author and journalist Michael Pollan to speak about “In Defense of Food”  last week, as a follow-up to the  book’s highly controversial selection as the first literature on the “Go Big Read” university-wide reading list. According to Feedstuffs, Pollan received $25,000 for his appearance. Does this figure seem more than a little ironic when dairy farmers are losing roughly 50 cents for each gallon of milk they produce? (more…)

One of the greatest rewards of my work is seeing people in agriculture effectively tell their story.  This week’s posting features some excellent examples of ways agriculturists can make a difference – and need to. (more…)

Consider this; one person on a farm tour could make thousands of positive impressions. That’s an excellent ROI compared to dismal milk and pork prices at the farm gate right now!  The following is written by a mom, health professional and speaker who experienced her first modern dairy farm tour last week as a part of speaking for a Vita-Plus event – and found an ‘ah-ha’ moment. Read on… (more…)

Creating ideas is my business. I frequently engage in “idea infatuation” and have lengthy discussion about how these ideas can help people in agriculture.  And, I’m constantly humbled by how others build on the initial thought and proliferate an idea to be far-reaching and truly impactful. (more…)

Michael Pollan of the New York Times and author of In Defense of Food, has gained a passionate following.  Many in our business don’t buy that Pollan’s in touch with modern agriculture.  He’s working on a new, likely very profitable book, and wants reader input on food rules. “In recent years, we’ve deferred to the voices of science and industry when it comes to eating, yet often their advice has served us poorly…” (more…)

    Nearly 700,000 children went hungry in the U.S. last year.  One in eight people in this nation struggled to feed themselves adequately.  Both of those startling facts, cited in an NBC report, came before the bottom fell out of the economy.  USDA indicates 12.2% of our population “didn’t have the money or assistance to get enough food to maintain active,  healthy lives.” (more…)
TM

How much do you know about where the food on your Thanksgiving table comes from?  This is a great time to consider those who produce the food on our overflowing plates, particularly in a year that has seen food prices increase 6% according to the Economic Research Service.

Celebrating a productive harvest was at the center of the table on the first Thanksgiving.  While that tradition has changed with 98.5% of Americans not in food production, farmers should be appreciated as they protect our national security by putting food on plates not only at Thanksgiving – but every meal each day.  Marketing misinformation has likely made you more familiar in with genes gone wild, organics, farm animal mistreatment and multi-million dollar activist organizations than with the hard-working people who provide you with the potatoes, turkeys and corn. (more…)

As the harvest season winds down, have you honored your roots in food production?  Whether you’re from a farm, the city or someplace in between – we all need to reflect upon our agrarian roots. 

I hope this video will help you do that; e-mail or call if you’d like copies for your holiday gifts.

Last night brought the unfortunate news about the passing of Proposition 2 in California.  Unfortunate because of how short-sighted the ballot initiative is.  Unfortunate because it was driven by the million dollar budget of industry activists (e.g. HSUS and Farm Sanctuary ) – rather than truly being a grassroots effort.  Unfortunate because it places animals over humans. Unfortunate because it further sets the stage for a rhetoric driven society with little value for science. (more…)

Next Page »